LodeStar 7.3 Build 26 Updates

LodeStar 7.3 Build 26 (released on September 24, 2019) is a significant minor release.  Here is a summary of the changes to this build.

ActivityMaker Mobile 

Challenger Page

To start, the main template, ActivityMaker Mobile, offers a new page type called Challenger Page.

Some of you who have been with us since LodeStar 6.0 might recall the Challenger Template.   ‘Challenger Page’ is completely different.  The ancestral lineage was the Presenter Template > Challenger Template > ActivityMaker Template > ActivityMaker Mobile.  In the ‘old’ days there was a separate template for everything.  Crossword, for example, was in its own template.  Now ActivityMaker Mobile does it all.  What used to be different templates are now just page types in ActivityMaker Mobile.  For the most part, the change has given authors far more flexibility.  But for some things, like Flashcards, it has raised the ‘difficulty’ level up a notch because authors must configure the gate that loops learners back to the unsuccessfully completed cards.

Now back to Challenger Page.  Challenger Page makes it easy to set up simple simulations where there is degree of randomness.   This article reveals all.

https://lodestarhelp.wordpress.com/2019/09/27/challenger-page/

New Midnite Layout and Theme

In the past, ActivityMaker Mobile offered Daylite, which allowed an activity to fit in nicely in terms of look and feel with such Learning Management Systems as D2L Brightspace.  But today, more and more Learning Management Systems either automatically launch, or offer an option to launch, content in its own window.   Any Learning Management System connected to the SCORM Cloud, for example, launches content in its own window.   The Daylite Layout and Theme might look a little spare in some situations when the content is viewed in its own window.   The Midnite layout and theme (with Menu Option 3) adds more graphical weight to the learning activity and presents the table of contents alongside the content when there is enough screen space.

midnightwithOrange

LodeStar Midnite Layout and Theme with a little splash of color

Learn more about Midnite and a new feature, Palettes, from this article:

https://lodestarhelp.wordpress.com/2019/09/17/layouts-themes-and-palettes/

Pass Threshold

In Tools > Project Settings you can now specify the pass threshold.  You can also set the condition of completion.  Either the activity is judged to be complete when the student displays the report or the activity is judged to be complete when the student meets or exceeds the pass threshold.

Lots of Fixes

Resource Buttons

Resource buttons sometimes required a single click or a double click.  Now it is consistent.  Always just a single click.

Branching to Report Page

In earlier versions, branching to the Report Page caused an issue.  In this version, you can branch to the Report branch and include it in Table of Contents.

New Data Entry components

Where appropriate, we have added look-up combo boxes.  For example, if you are adding an item to a category, you can either type in a new category or click on an existing category.  The Drag and Drop Widget and Challenger Page are examples of where this component is used.

Table of Contents

We added Menu Style 3 to the table of contents.  When using the Midnite layout, this menu option shows the menu automatically alongside the content if there is enough screen space. In other layouts, it automatically appears but may overlap the content in some situations.

Page Level Branch Options when Page Displays

Page Level Branch Options Executed on Page Show have been improved.  You can find this setting at the top of the page .

branch_icon

 

MathML Support

mathml

LodeStar now properly renders MathML in its HTML Editor.  That’s the good news.  The bad news is that at the time of this writing (September 27, 2019)  Firefox and Safari support MathML, but Internet Explorer and Chrome do not. If this technology is important to you, you have the option of directing your students to use Firefox or Safari.

LodeStar discontinued support for MathJax, which was a work around to the lack of browser support for MathML.  The retirement of the MathJax Content Delivery Network (CDN) caused problems and so, today, we rely solely on native browser support for MathML.  We hope that Google Chrome will re-enable this critical technology.

Improved SCORM data

ActivityMaker Mobile now accurately reports on the amount of time the learner has spent on an activity.

ARMaker

Directional Heading Now Supported

In addition to latitude and longitude,  authors can now specify a heading (in degrees).  So, for example, if a student is heading north away from a point of interest, the application can re-direct the student.  If the student is heading south toward the same point of interest, the application can remain silent.

Conclusion

LodeStar continues to be improved with each minor release, even as we think about and plan the next major release.

 

 

Challenger Page

Introduction:

The Challenger Page type implements the State Response Engine, which is a new interaction type that we’re developing.  Simply described, the State Response Engine (SRE) randomly selects a state (a situation or condition) and presents responses to the learners in the form of actions.  Some of the responses will be correct, based on the randomly chosen state; others will be less correct or plainly incorrect.  A response might be incorrect in one randomly selected situation but correct in another situation.  Some responses can be always correct; other responses can be configured to be never correct.

One example is worth ten thousand words.   Let’s picture a composting problem.  Composting is a great thing to talk about in instructional design because the practice of composting is rich with terms, concepts, procedures, principles and problems.  It is also something that people can relate to….generally. SRE promotes higher order thinking and so, we’ll focus on a composting problem.

Take a look at a short example.  You will see several pages of content and then the challenge. We purposely kept the content very simple.  It is simply representative of information that might precede a challenge. It might also provide context.

http://lodestarlearning.com/samples/The_Composter_V2/index.htm

The_Composter_Challenge

Screenshot of LodeStar Learning’s State Response Engine (Challenger Page)

The situation is that you (as the learner) have a compost bin in your back yard.  Someone brings you a pile of organic material to add to the compost.  The organic material is randomly chosen by the computer program.  It could be:

Maple leaves
Birch leaves
Walnut leaves
A mix of plant stems
Apple processing sludge
Fruit wastes
Hay
Brown leaves
Green leaves
Vegetable produce

Our demonstration

For our demonstration we’ve chosen two random states out of the list above:

  1.  You are presented with bags and bags of leaves (not brown).
  2.  You are presented with bags and bags of vegetable produce.

Both of these states are associated with the category titled ‘Organic Material’.
When the user clicks on the ‘Organic Material’ button for the first time, the activity will reveal what the computer has already chosen: either state 1 or state 2.   This works even if the learner clicks on the categories out of order.

Each of these requires a different set of responses.   The responses could be:

Check moisture level
Check temperature
Separate leaves into their own compost
Shred material into small pieces
Mix with a high nitrogen source
Mix with carbon rich material

For the first stage or first category or first whatever, we have chosen the following as optional responses:

Check moisture level
Check temperature
Separate leaves into their own compost

In this scenario with only the two possible states, the answer is easy.  The first two options will be always correct; the third option will never be correct.

Now on to the category ‘Problem One’.

The two random states associated with ‘Problem One’ are:

  1. Temperature is dropping
  2. The compost is beginning to smell.

The computer program will check what earlier states each of these new states is dependent upon.

‘Temperature is dropping’ is dependent upon ‘You are presented with bags and bags of leaves (not brown).’

‘The compost is beginning to smell.’ is dependent upon ‘You are presented with bags and bags of vegetable produce.’

In the first category, if the computer randomly chose the ‘bags and bags of leaves’ state, it will only choose those random states that are dependent upon this condition.  Now, in our example, we only have two states.  We could have dozens.  So, in our example, if the computer chooses bags and bags of leaves, problem one will be ‘Temperature is dropping’.  If the computer chooses vegetable produce, problem one will be related to smell.

Now the learner examines each of the options.

You can imagine loads of situations here.  I’ve limited the example to a couple of states but you can easily see the following scenarios:

If the computer chose brown leaves, the following responses would be correct:

Shred material into small pieces
Separate into its own composter

If the computer chose maple leaves, the following responses would be correct:

Shred material into small pieces
Mix with a high nitrogen source

Problem Two will be one of the following:

  1. After a while your compost process is stalling out. You have a lot of vegetable material.
  2. After a while your compost process is stalling out. You have a lot of leaves and dead grass.

The first state in problem two is dependent upon vegetable matter in the first category. The second state is dependent upon bags and bags of leaves.

You can imagine that this could get very sophisticated with lots of random states, lots of categories (or phases), lots of options, and a lot of resources.

But let’s keep it simple to start.

Let’s Build It Step By Step

The first thing you need is the LodeStar Learning eLearning authoring tool called LodeStar.  You can download it here.

http://www.lodestarlearning.com/lodestar-14-day-trial.html

You need LodeStar 7.3 Build 26 or later (which was first published on September 24, 2019).  If you don’t have a license you can request a free license for 14 days. Whatever you create is yours to keep.

  • Launch LodeStar and select the ActivityMaker Mobile template.  Click on the ‘Create Project’ button.   Title your project ‘Compost Challenge’.  Click the ‘Ok’ button.Please note:  The default layout and theme for ActivityMaker Mobile is Daylite.  The examples shown, however, use the Midnite layout and theme.  To switch, follow these directions:

https://lodestarhelp.wordpress.com/2019/09/17/layouts-themes-and-palettes/

Let’s continue:

  • The default page is a Text Page.   Create a title page as you normally would in an HTML editor. A simple title will suffice.
  • Click on the ‘Add Page’ button to create a new page.  NewPageButton
  • Change the page type of the new page by clicking on the arrow in the Pages panel and selecting ‘Challenger’.  In the screenshot below, you will find the > button to the left of the label ‘2’.
    Change_Page_Type

 

Let’s now recreate the Composter Challenge.  The Challenger Page features a data input component where you can type in overall instructions and add a title and category, as well as control how the challenge will play out.

Here are some example instructions:

Click on each of the categories below. You will be presented with information. Based on the information, select the right options. We’ll display the ‘Submit’ button after every category has been examined. In Problems One and Two, keep an eye out for helpful resources at the bottom. They will appear as buttons.

In the example I’ve shown, the Challenger Page randomly selected one of the following options:

  • You are presented with bags and bags of leaves (not brown).
  • You are presented with bags and bags of vegetable produce.

Let’s recreate that.

But first note that the Challenge Page Type features a data input control.  The data input control manages data pages.  The + button adds data pages.  The – button deletes data pages.  The <- button moves a data page towards the beginning.  The -> moves a data page towards the end.

Secondly, in the instructions below, you are either creating a data page that holds a randomly selected state or a data page that holds a response option.  There isn’t much to configuring a state data page.  You just need a title, a category, and the ‘Random State’ options menu set to ‘Yes’.  Response data pages require much more information.  So let’s get started for real this time:

  • Type  in ‘You are presented with bags and bags of leaves (not brown).’ in the Title field.  Type in ‘Organic Material’ in the Category field. Select ‘Yes’ in the Random State pull down options. Don’t worry about the remaining fields.  Your form should resemble the screenshot below:

    ChallengerPage1

    LodeStar Learning Challenger Page Configuration

  • Click on the data input component + button, which appears just to the left of label ‘Title’.  This will add a new data page. (Notice that I said data page, not page. We only need one ‘Challenger’ page, which will hold many data pages.)
  • Type  in ‘You are presented with bags and bags of vegetable produce.’ in the Title field.  Select ‘Organic Material’ from the Category combo box. Select ‘Yes’ in the Random State option menu.
  • Add a new data page by clicking on the data input component + button.  Type in ‘Separate leaves into their own compost.’  in the Title field. Select ‘Organic Material’ from the Category combo box.  Fill in 0 points.  Select ‘Never Correct’ from the Correct Response combo.   Type in the following feedback in the Feedback A field: ‘These leaves aren’t brown and are not likely to produce leaf mold.’Please note that it is understood that this is not a random state, but a response.  If you want to make this explicit, select ‘No’ in the Random State option menu.
  • Add a new data page by clicking on the data input component + button.  Type in ‘Check moisture level’ in the Title field. Select ‘Organic Material’ from the Category combo box.  Assign 10 points. Select ‘Always Correct’ from the Correct Response menu.
  • Add a new data page by clicking on the data input component + button.  Type in ‘Check temperature’ in the Title field. Select ‘Organic Material’ from the Category combo box. Assign 10 points. Select ‘Always Correct’ from the Correct Response menu.

Let’s recap what we have done.  The computer will select from one of two random states.  The computer will either select bags of leaves or bags of produce.  In either situation, separating leaves into their own compost pile is not a good option.  It is incorrect.  If the leaves were brown, the situation would be different.  In either case, whether there are a lot of leaves or a lot of produce, checking moisture and checking temperature are correct.  This is what it should look like to the learner. (Ignore the categories of Problem One and Problem Two.  We haven’t created them yet.)

OrganicMaterialCategory.png

  • Add a new data page.  Type in ‘Temperature is Dropping’ in the Title field. Type in ‘Problem One’ in the Category combo box. Select ‘Yes’ in the Random State option menu.   Select ‘You are presented with bags and bags of leaves…” from the ‘Dependency On’ options menu.   Don’t assign any points.  This is a randomly chosen state and not a learner response.  This state will only be selected if ‘bags and bags of leaves’ was previously selected by the computer program.  Select ‘Not Applicable’ from the Correct Response options menu.  This is just an explicit way of saying that the Correct Response options don’t apply here.  They don’t apply to randomly selected states.
  • In my example, I added a resource on this data page.  If ‘Temperature is Dropping’ is randomly chosen by the computer based on the fact that bags and bags of leaves was previously chosen in the last category, a resource button will appear.  The actual resource is just another LodeStar Text Page.  To link this state to another page, paste in the Page ID for the page.  The resource presents information that will help the learner make the right selections in this category.  Only Text Pages can serve as resources.
  • Add a new data page.  Type in ‘The compost is beginning to smell.’ in the Title field. Select ‘Problem One’ in the Category combo box. Select ‘Yes’ in the Random State option menu.   Select ‘You are presented with bags and bags of vegetable produce.” from the ‘Dependency On’ options menu.   Don’t assign any points.  This again is a randomly chosen state and not a learner response.  This state will only be selected if ‘bags and bags of produce’ was previously selected by the computer program.  Select ‘Not Applicable’ from the Correct Response options menu.
  • Add a new data page.  Type in ‘Turn over the pile’ in the Title field. Select ‘Problem One’ from the Category combo box. Assign 10 points. Select ‘Always Correct’ from the Correct Response menu.
  • Add a new data page.  Type in ‘Add meat’ in the Title field. Select ‘Problem One’ from the Category combo box. Assign 10 points. Select ‘Never Correct’ from the Correct Response menu.  For Feedback A, type in ‘Never a good idea. Meat will attract rodents and cause your compost to smell.’
    • If a learner selected ‘Add Meat’ s/he would lose 10 points or whatever number of points was assigned to this data page.
    • Feedback A is shown when someone incorrectly selects a response option.
    • Feedback B is shown if response option or item is incorrectly omitted.
  • Add a new data page.  Type in ‘Add lots of fresh green material on top of the old.’. Select ‘Problem One’ from the Category combo box. Assign 10 points.  Select ‘You are presented with bags and bags of leaves’ from the ‘Dependency On’ options. Select ‘Correct if Dependency Exists’ from the Correct Response menu.  For Feedback A, type in ‘Lots of fresh material on top won’t help the smell.’  For Feedback B, type in ‘Lots of fresh material on top might help to build temp.’
    • Here we get to the heart of the matter.  If the computer previously selected ‘bags and bags of leaves’, then this response would be the correct response in the event of temperature dropping.  If the computer previously selected ‘produce’, then this would be an inappropriate response.
  • Add a new data page.  Type in ‘Shred the leaves into smaller pieces’. Select ‘Problem One’ from the Category combo box. Assign 10 points.  Select ‘You are presented with bags and bags of leaves’ from the ‘Dependency On’ options. Select ‘Correct if Dependency Exists’ from the Correct Response menu.  For Feedback A, type in ‘You don’t have many leaves’  For Feedback B, type in ”Shredding leaves is important to air out the compost and allow water to carry nutrients.’
    • If produce were selected and the learner chose to shred the leaves into smaller pieces, the learner would lose 10 points and get the feedback for A.
    • If leaves were selected and the learner neglected to choose ‘shred the leaves’, then the learner would lose 10 points and get the feedback for B. To sum up, feedback is for incorrectly selected and incorrectly omitted response options.
  • This is what it looks like if the computer selected ‘produce’. Notice that a resource  has shown up.  It is labelled “Smell Problem Solver’.

ProblemTwoCategory

  • I then went on to create Problem Two, which described rapidly falling temperatures.  If we have  nitrogen rich material we can add carbon.  If we have carbon in abundance, we can use nitrogen rich materials.  The carbon:nitrogen ratios are available as resources so that the learner can select the right materials to restore the correct ratios.

 

Conclusion

Keep it simple to start.  Once you get comfortable you can also add images to both your random states and your response options.

If you don’t want to recreate the composting problem, have the computer randomly select odd or even.  Then create some even numbered response options and some odd numbered response options.  Make those options dependent on the odd or even state.

Finally, the learners will see the submit button once they have reviewed each of the categories.  After they submit, a detailed response is shown that provides feedback for each and every option.  The feedback is also added to the transcript for future study.

For more advanced LodeStar authors, you can combine the Challenger Page with branching and present learners with increasingly difficult challenges.

Good luck.  If you create a challenge, drop me a line at robert.bilyk@LodeStarLearning.com  I would love to hear from you and would appreciate your feedback even if you don’t create anything.  If you want your comments to be public, register with this site and add your comments.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Layouts, Themes and Palettes

Introduction

In LodeStar 7.3 build 25 (published 09-16-19) and later, authors can control the layout and look of their activities.  Currently, layouts, themes and palettes can be chosen for an opened project by selecting Tools > Layouts, Tools > Themes, and Tools > Palettes respectively.

When authors create a new activity with the ActivityMaker Mobile template, the default look and feel is Daylite:

daylite

In this example, the author is creating an interactive story that places the reader in the shoes of a Japanese American who is threatened with internment.  Featured in the screenshot above is the Daylite layout, the Daylite theme, and the Daylite Palette.

The Daylite layout features the navigation buttons, the page numbers and other controls above the activity.  The default table of contents (menu) type is Menu Style 3, which is controlled by a project setting found under Tools > Project Settings.

Let’s transform this default look and feel to ‘Midnite’.

Our objective is to transform the layout above to the following:

midnight.png

Notice a few changes.  The menu now runs alongside the activity (if the screen width allows it).  The background color is black.  The navigation is at the bottom. The other controls are still at the top.

To effect this change, I did the following:

  1. Select Tools > Layout.  Select Midnite.
  2. Select Tools > Theme.  Select Midnite.
  3. Select Tools > Palette.  Select Midnite.

The Midnite layout places the navigation at the bottom.  The bottom edge of the navigation area is rounded.  The top edge of the viewer area is rounded.

Let’s make this change, one step at a time.  First the layout.  Let’s select Midnite.

JustMidnightLayout.png

In the screenshot above we can see that the navigation is now at the bottom.   The theme is still Daylite.  The theme controls the menu color.  If the menu background is light, the text color automatically becomes dark, and visa versa.

Next we will select the Midnite theme.

midnightthemedialog

Notice, the Menu/Resource Button color.  It is set by default to #282828.  That is hexadecimal code for a very dark color.  We can see the color in the color chip to the left.  It is almost black — not fully black.  Black would be #000000.  White is #FFFFFF.  But you don’t need to know the code.  Just observe the color chip.

Next we will select the Midnite palette, which has no effect on the title page pictured in the screenshot.

Select Tools > Palettes and then select Midnite.

 

palette

Hover over the color palette to the right.  The tool tip describes what components the colors affect.  For example, the top color affects panel backgrounds; the lower left affects text fields.

Let’s say that we wanted an orange navigation area instead as pictured below.

midnightwithOrange

To accomplish this, we keep the Midnite Layout, Theme and Palette.  We change some parameters in the theme.

Select  Tools > Themes.  Click on the Advanced button.

advanced

The screenshot above shows the ‘Advanced’ dialog in the Theme Manager.  Click on the little stop gradient indicators (home plates) below the color bar and then pick a color.

Finally, the menu type and the visibility of the accessibility icon, the transcript icon, etc. are controlled by, as mentioned, Tools > Project Settings.

 

 

New Method of Uploading LodeStar Activities to D2L Brightspace

Introduction:

D2L supports a new method of uploading SCORM activities into its system.  LodeStar activities are SCORM objects.

We think the new method potentially presents a huge improvement over the legacy method because it supports reuse of activities across courses, improves the update experience, and gives the instructor much more control over the grade calculation than in the past. But caveat emptor.  We haven’t had much direct experience with this new method. We would welcome your feedback at

supportteam@LodeStarLearning.com

For the legacy method, please view this article.  For the new method, read on.

New Method: Add LodeStar Activity to the Content tool

Inside of LodeStar 7.x do the following:

  1. Open your project, if not already opened. You will find your most recently used project under ‘File’.
  2. Select the Export button. Pay attention to where your zip file will be saved.
  3. Keep the default ‘SCORM 1.3 (Recommended)’ selected.
  4. Fill in the Module, Topic and Author Fields.
  5. Click on ‘Create Export’ button.

Inside of D2L BrightSpace 10.8 or later, do the following:

New Firefox Release Impacts LodeStar Authors

In early 2019, Lodestar released a new previewer. With the new previewer, authors could see precisely what their students were seeing in a browser when the activity was served up by a learning management system (LMS).

The improved previewer eliminated the need to launch a local project manually from, for example,  Firefox.  But some authors got accustomed to previewing projects in Firefox. Firefox, Edge and Internet Explorer were the only browsers that supported a local project accessing local data stored on the hard drive. Of the three, we always recommended Firefox.  Of course, once the project was uploaded to an LMS, students could use any browser to view the project – just as they can now.

With the latest release of Firefox 68.0, developers discontinued Firefox’s ability to access local data.  Given this change, authors must now use the Lodestar built-in previewer. Firefox no longer supports local access to data.

The good news is that authors will find the built-in previewer convenient and an improvement over the past. Lodestar serves up the project to the default browser. Lodestar behaves like a web server, enabling the browser to access the data. The entire experience is a more streamlined experience for the author.

preview

LodeStar behaves like a web server that serves up projects to the browser for preview.

To ensure a trouble-free experience, authors should be aware of what browser is their default browser.  A quick search on the web will provide step by step instructions for the operating system on how to set a specific browser to be the default.  Authors can choose any modern and up-to-date browser.  They should then launch their default browser from the desktop.  If it launches, that means that LodeStar can launch the browser when previewing a project.  If it fails to launch, authors should try re-installing the browser application.

Matching

Matching is an activity that requires students to associate things.   Students may be asked to associate a word with its definition, or a picture with its label.

LodeStar supports ‘matching’ with its Drag and Drop widget (text only) and with the Organizer page type.  This article focuses on Organizer.

Organizer can be simple or complex.  We’ll keep our example simple.

Let’s say our goal is to require students to drag instructional design terms next to their matching definitions.

  1. In the ‘ActivityMaker Mobile’ template, add a new page.  2019-05-04_2003
  2. Change page type to ‘Organizer’ by clicking on the arrow in the Pages Panel.  2019-05-04_2006
  3. Type instructions in the ‘Instructions’ field.  Be concise.  For our example, I will type ‘Drag the terms on the right next to their definitions.’
  4. If you have long definitions, type in a row height of 50 or more.  (Only available in LodeStar 7.3 Build 22 or above.)
  5. Type in a value for the number of points that you are assigning to this activity.
  6. Next to ‘Text’, type the definition.  For our example, I will type ‘An Instructional Design Model’.  Don’t worry if your full definition doesn’t fit in the box.
  7. The definition will be in row 1 and column 1.  To fix the definition in this spot, I will type in ‘1’ for row,  ‘1’ for position, ‘y’ for Pinned., and 200 for Optional Width.  This will fix the definition in the first column, first row.  To prevent something from being draggable, type in ‘y’ for pinned.So far the definition has been configured as pictured below.
2019-05-04_2015

A screenshot showing a definition being ‘pinned’ in row 1, column 1. Pinned means not draggable.

  1. Click the  2019-05-04_2014 on the left to add a new item.  This will create a new data page.
  2. This time, the item will be draggable.  Type in the name of the item in the Text field.  For our example, I will type ‘ADDIE’
  3. Type in ‘1’ for row and ‘2’ for position.  This, in effect, will judge the term correct if the student places the term in the first row and in the second column.  ‘Position’ in this context means column.  In other contexts, it might simply mean order.

Our term has been configured as pictured below.

2019-05-04_2021

A screenshot showing a term that will be randomly placed on the screen and made draggable.

  1. Repeat the above steps several times to add items — but do not add too many items.   The screenshot below shows what the activity looks like with three definitions and three randomly placed items.  I increased the optional width of the column to 300.
2019-05-04_2033

A screenshot of the activity as it appears to students.

Each time the project is refreshed, the terms on the right will appear in a new random position.

Please note:   The Organizer Page can be used in an even simpler manner.  Suppose you wanted to randomly order the names of United States Presidents.   To accomplish this, type in the names of presidents on the data pages.  Create a new data page (not regular page) for each president.  The first president will be assigned position 1; the second president will be assigned position 2, and so forth.  Do not fill in row or anything else.  In this context, ‘position’ is order.

Exporting a Project to D2L BrightSpace 10.8 +

Inside of LodeStar 7.x do the following:

  1. Open your project, if not already opened. You will find your most recently used project under ‘File’.
  2. Select the Export button. Pay attention to where your zip file will be saved.
  3. Keep the default ‘SCORM 1.3 (Recommended)’ selected.
  4. Fill in the Module, Topic and Author Fields.
  5. Click on ‘Create Export’ button.

 

Inside of D2L BrightSpace 10.8 or later, do the following:

  1. Go to your course.
  2. Select ‘Course Administration’
  3. Select ‘Import/Export/Copy Components’
  4. In response to the question ‘What would like to do?, select the ‘Import Components’ radio button. Select the ‘from a course package’ radio button.
  5. Click on the ‘Start’ button at the bottom of the screen.
  6. In the ‘Import Course Package’’ screen, click on ‘Upload’ button.
  7. Use the File Browser to find the zipped up learning object. (The file might be located in a shared folder or, in the case of LodeStar, it might be located in the LodeStar/Exports’ folder.)
  8. Once the file has uploaded, click on the ‘Import All Components’ button.
  9. Once the process has completed, click on the ‘View Content’ button to navigate to the Content Tool.   D2L will always append your new module and topic to the end of your list of modules.

 

Linking Project (Learning Object) to Gradebook

  1. In D2L, navigate to the module and topic that matches your learning object.
  2. Move the topic to the module of your choice if needed. Future uploads of the same learning object will automatically update the topic.
  3. Select the title to open the topic. At the bottom of the screen, you will see the heading ‘Assessment — Add a grade item…”
  4. Click on ‘Add a grade item…”
  5. In the pull down menu that displays ‘No Grade’, select the grade item that you wish to use to record the score reported by the learning object. D2L will automatically do the math to convert points earned in the learning object to points earned in the grade book.    Alternatively, click on the ‘+’ button to create a new grade book item.   In the ‘New Grade Item’ dialog, fill in Name, Select Category if needed, and fill in the Maximum Points.  Click the ‘Create’ button.
  6. Check ‘Push all existing scores to grades’, if so desired.
  7. Click ‘Save’.